Welcome to Boswell Book Company's website!

 

Select upcoming events below. Visit our upcoming event page for a more complete listing.


You're on the Boswell Book Company page and our guess is that you want to know where we're located and how to get a hold of us. Here are the basics:

Our address is Boswell Book Company, 2559 N. Downer Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211. This is our only location. Don't let a yellow pages tell you otherwise. The store is located on the same block as the Downer Theater, up the bluff from Lincoln Memorial Drive. We're north of Columbia St. Mary's Hospital and south of UWM. We're also pretty much on the southernmost tip of Lake Drive.

Our phone number is 414-332-1181. Sometimes you'll see other numbers appear on your phone when we call you, as we have multiple lines. This is our only number that has a classic exchange--EDgewood, if you are into these things.

Our email contact info is info@boswellbooks.com, if you'd like to place a special order or get basic info about an event or are wondering about our hours.

Speaking of hours, we're open 10 am to 9 pm from Monday through Saturday, and 10 am to 6 pm on Sunday. We're closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas, and there are about five holidays where we're open 10 am to 5 pm, plus we sometimes close early for events and meetings. You can assume that if we have a ticketed event in the store, we're closed to the public around 5:30.  

We've heard that after location and contact info, the reason why folks visit websites like ours is to find out about events. We keep our events on one upcoming event page, but some highlights are listed below, generally our ticketed events, but sometimes a few others are included.

And the third reason folks visit is to order books. Our site search engine is not as good as some of our well-financed online competitors, but it will do. One of the nice things we like to point out is that you can check inventory and even the subsection of the book, but be aware, the number does not take into account customer holds, receiving errors, and general misshelving. As we like to say, we just need one person to put a book back in the wrong place for it to be lost forever, or at least until we do our next section check.Our system allows you to put a book on hold without first registering an account. Try it!


Darryl “DMC” McDaniels, author of Ten Ways Not to Commit Suicide: A Memoir
Saturday, August 27, 7:00 pm, at Boswell

As one third of the legendary rap group Run-D.M.C., Darryl “DMC” McDaniels—aka Legendary MC, The Devastating Mic Controller, and the King of Rock—had it all: talent, money, fame, prestige. While hitting #1 on the Billboard charts was exhilarating, the group’s success soon became overwhelming. A creative guy who enjoyed being at home alone or with his family, DMC turned to alcohol to numb himself, a retreat that became an addiction. For years, he went through the motions. But in 1997, when intoxication could no longer keep the pain at bay, he plunged into severe depression and became suicidal. But he wasn’t alone. During the same period, suicide became the number three leading cause of death among black people - a health crisis that continues to this day.

In this memoir, DMC speaks openly about his emotional and psychological struggles and the impact on his life, and addresses the many reasons that led him—and thousands of others—to consider suicide. Some of the factors include not being true to who you are, feelings of loneliness, isolation, and alienation, and a lack of understanding and support from friends and family when it’s needed most. He also provides essential information on resources for getting help. Revealing how even the most successful people can suffer from depression, DMC offers inspiration for everyone in pain—information and insight that he hopes can help save other lives.

Praise from Queen Latifah: "Darryl DMC McDaniels is a deeply-talented artist who has much to teach us. I applaud his courage and compassion in sharing his personal story. Ten Ways Not To Commit Suicide is an inspiring read for all audiences."

About the Author: Darryl McDaniels “DMC” made his start in the music business with the groundbreaking rap group Run-D.M.C., which he founded with Joseph (Rev. Run) Simmons and the late, great Jason (Jam Master Jay) Mizell. The multi-platinum music group has sold more than thirty million singles and albums worldwide, and has had a major influence on popular culture, transforming Rap and Hip Hop into the most popular music in the world and building a fan base that rivals the biggest acts in Rock ’n’ Roll. He lives in New York City.

 


Stories and activities with Lisa Moser, author of Stories from Bug Garden
Sunday, August 28, 2:00 pm, at Boswell

What may appear to be an abandoned garden is actually home to an unusual array of insects. Meet a ladybug who prefers making mud angels to acting like a lady, a roly-poly bug who loves to roll (“wa-hoo!”), a cricket who dreams of grand adventures, and a whole neighborhood of bugs gazing up at a fireworks show of flowers bursting into bloom. These inviting vignettes are sure to have readers seeing bugs in a whole new light.

Join us for an afternoon of bug related poetry and activities with Wisconsin’s own Lisa Moser. We’ve been having so much fun selling this book since spring, and decided we absolutely had to do more to let you know about it. It’s summer now when you take bugs for granted, but in January, you’ll be thinking about dragonflies and crickets and grasshoppers and Stories from Bug Garden can be your memory book.

About the Author: Lisa Moser is the author of the early readers The Monster in the Backpack and Squirrel’s Fun Day as well as many picture books, including Kisses on the Wind, and the sadly now out-of-print Railroad Hank. She lives in Grafton.


A mini science fiction convention with Mary Robinette Kowal, author of Ghost Talkers and Ada Palmer, author of Too Like the Lightning
Wednesday, August 31, 7:00 pm, at Boswell

Join two beacons of the science fiction and fantasy world, Ada Palmer and Mary Robinette Kowal, for a spirited conversation about their new books, writing, and who knows what else? It’s like having a science fiction and fantasy convention back in Milwaukee, only a really tiny one. Boswell-con, anyone?

Having just completed her Glamourist Histories cycle, Chicago’s Mary Robinette Kowal offers up Ghost Talkers, a just-released novel featuring the mysterious spirit corps and their heroic work in World War I. Ginger Stuyvesant, an American heiress living in London during World War I, is engaged to Captain Benjamin Hartshorne, an intelligence officer. Ginger is a medium for the Spirit Corps, a special Spiritualist force. Each soldier heading for the front is conditioned to report to the mediums of the Spirit Corps when they die so the Corps can pass instant information about troop movements to military intelligence. When Ginger, one of the Corps, discovers a traitor, the top brass thinks she's imagining things. But she most definitely is not.

From Ada Palmer, we present the first book of Terra Ignota, a four-book political SF epic set in a human future of extraordinary originality. Palmer has created a hard-won uptopian world built on technologically created abundance and the complex and mandatory systems of labelling all public writing and speech, with normal gender distinctions now distinctly taboo, and economic and cultural competition carefully managed by central planners. In this world is Mycroft Canner, a convict. For his crimes he is required, as is the custom of the 25th century, to wander the world being as useful as he can to all he meets. He meets Carlyle Foster, a sensayer - a spiritual counselor in a world that has outlawed the public practice of religion, but which also knows that the inner lives of humans cannot be wished away. But there's another player in this story, a young boy, who could destabilize the system with his strange power to animate objects. As Hugo and Nebula winner Jo Walton writes of Too Like the Lightning: "Lots of books can knock you over and leave you reeling and dazzled when you're fifteen, but it takes something special to do the same thing to you at fifty."

About the authors: Mary Robinette Kowal is the 2008 recipient of the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, a multiple Hugo winner, and a frequent finalist for the Nebula and Locus Awards. A professional puppeteer and voice actor, she spent five years touring nationally with puppet theaters. She lives in Chicago with her husband Rob and nine manual typewriters.

Ada Palmer is a professor in the history department of the University of Chicago, specializing in Renaissance history and the history of ideas. Her first nonfiction book, Reading Lucretius in the Renaissance, was published in 2014 by Harvard University Press. She is also a composer of folk and Renaissance-tinged a capella music, most of which she performs with the group Sassafrass. She writes about history for a popular audience at exurbe.com and about SF and fantasy-related matters at Tor.com.


Wednesday, September 7, 7:00 pm, at Boswell

In the Progressive Era of American history, the state of Wisconsin gained national attention for its innovative economic and political reforms. Amidst this ferment, the Wisconsin Idea was popularized, the concept that a public university should improve the lives of people beyond the borders of its campus. Governor Robert La Follette routinely consulted with University of Wisconsin researchers to devise groundbreaking programs and legislation. Although the Wisconsin Idea is often attributed to a 1904 speech by Charles Van Hise, president of the University of Wisconsin, David Hoeveler argues that it originated decades earlier, in the creative and fertile mind of John Bascom.

A philosopher, theologian, and sociologist, Bascom deeply influenced a generation of students at the University of Wisconsin, including La Follette and Van Hise. Hoeveler documents how Bascom drew concepts from German idealism, liberal Protestantism, and evolutionary theory, transforming them into advocacy for social and political reform. He was a champion of temperance, women's rights, and labor, all of which brought him controversy as president of the university from 1874 to 1887. In a way unmatched by any leader of a major American university in his time, Bascom outlined a social gospel that called for an expanded role for state governments and universities as agencies of moral improvement. Hoeveler traces the intellectual history of the Wisconsin Idea from the nineteenth century to such influential Progressive Era thinkers as Richard T. Ely and John R. Commons, who believed university researchers should be a vital source of expertise for government and citizens.

About the Author: J. David Hoeveler is Distinguished Professor of History at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee


Thursday, September 8, 7:00 pm, at Boswell

Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, home to only a handful of people, is a harsh and lonely place. So when James Campbell’s cousin Heimo Korth asked him to spend a summer building a cabin in the rugged Interior, Campbell hesitated about inviting along his fifteen-year-old daughter, Aidan: Would she be able to withstand clouds of mosquitoes, bathing in an ice-cold river, and hours of grueling labor? Despite a (healthy) fear of grizzlies, Aidan embraced the wild, and even agreed to return with her father months later to help the Korths trap and hunt for caribou and moose, trading mosquitoes for windchills of 50 degrees below zero. Returning home, Campbell saw a confidence in Aidan that reflected her growing maturity as much as her having weathered an Interior winter. Taking his cue from a traditional Eskimo rite of passage, Campbell decided to take Aidan back to Alaska one final time before she left home. It would be their most ambitious trip, backpacking over mountains to the headwaters of the mighty Hulahula River, where they would assemble a folding canoe and paddle to the Arctic Ocean. The journey would test them, and their relationship, in one of the planet’s most remote places: a land of wolves, musk oxen, Dall sheep, golden eagles, and polar bears.

Poignant and humorous by turns, Braving It “captures both the difficulties and pleasures on offer in the extreme wild” (Richmond Times Dispatch) and is a profound meditation on what it means for a child to grow up--and a parent to finally, fully let go.

About the Author: James Campbell is the author of The Final Frontiersman and The Ghost Mountain Boys. He has written for Outside magazine, National Geographic Adventure, and Men's Journal. He lives in Lodi, Wisconsin.


Monday, September 12, 7:00 pm, Television history, pop culture, at The Soup House, 324 E Michigan St, in downtown Milwaukee

Admission is $5 plus taxes and fees ($6.17 total) including a bowl of soup. $6 tickets may be available at the door on the night of the event if not sold out. Visit the Brown Paper Tickets website for details.

The hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld, the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world, altering the lives of everyone it touched. This book has now spent three weeks on The New York Times bestseller list.

Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly forty million Americans were tuning in weekly.

In Seinfeldia, acclaimed TV historian and entertainment writer Jennifer Keishin Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!”, Joe Davola gets questioned every day about his sanity, Kenny Kramer makes his living giving tours of New York sights from the show, and fans dress up in Jerry’s famous puffy shirt, dance like Elaine, and imagine plotlines for Seinfeld if it were still on TV.

About the Author: Jennifer Keishin Armstrong is the author of Mary and Lou and Rhoda and Ted, a history of The Mary Tyler Moore Show. She writes about pop culture for several publications, including The New York Times Book Review, Fast Company, and Vulture. She grew up in Homer Glen, Illinois, and now lives in New York City.